Movie Reviews 340 – All About Eve (1950)

I was going to write a review for an entirely different type of movie this week but the ‘chinglish’ dubbing was so atrocious I could not be sure what some of the points of discussion really meant (that movie was Jet Li’s early oeuvre Lord of the Wu-Tang for those that are curious and I may attempt it again in the future). But as luck would have it I watched All About Eve the following night and was so enthralled I just had to write about it instead and solve my problem at the same time

I always thought that Bette Davis had her second coming with What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?, easily my favorite Davis film. But it turns out that that was her second career revival as she had already faded once before only to be resurrected by her stunning performance in All About Eve. Even I have to admit her performance here was almost as outstanding as her Baby Jane role. What makes all this so bizzare are the multitude of ‘life imitating art’ coincidences associated with both this movie and What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?.  Davis plays an aging movie star while herself being considered a has-been at time, and in both cases she earned Oscar nominations for those portrayals.  Also in both cases, what happened behind the scenes eerily mimicked the plots of the movies.

Both written and directed by Joseph Mankiewicz, the story about a calculating and conniving aspiring actress Eve (Anne Baxter) that manipulates star Margo Channing (Davis) and her entourage by eliciting pity and plying adoration as needed to make her way up the Broadway ladder. Her marks include Margo’s boyfriend Bill (Gary Merrill), Margo’s best friend Karen (Celeste Holm) and her playwright husband Lloyd (Hugh Marlowe), and the theater critic Addison (George Sanders) in this circle of friends. This is literally all about Eve’s lies, deceit and games, all geared towards taking Margo’s place.

I’ve always said that if any movie is worth its salt it begins with a good script and All About Eve is a fine example of that axiom. It seemed that almost ever sentence had a double meaning and the perception of almost every character seems to change from good to bad or the other way around. It is chock full of memorable one liners like Lloyd noting “It’s about time the piano realized it has not written the concerto!” or Davis’ famous “Hold on, it’s going to be a bumpy night.

My 20th Century Fox “Studio Classics” DVD contained a “Backstory” documentary on the making of the film which detailed the history as well many aspects where the film echoed real life. For instance, while Davis was a shoe in for the Best Actress Oscar nomination, Baxter fought and convinced producer Darryl Zanuck that she should vie for the same Oscar and not settle for a Supporting Actress one. But by pitting both performers in the same category and presumably having them take one one another’s votes they both lost, effectively both losing oscars probably would have otherwise won had they been in separate categories.

There is so much more to this movie that tackles ageism, the politics of theater, fame, and of course love and friendship. There is even a decent amount of comedy, most of that coming from Margo’s assistant Birdie (Thelma Ritter). But the best is of course Bette Davis essentially playing… well herself.

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

2 Responses to “Movie Reviews 340 – All About Eve (1950)”

  1. Elizabeth Buchan-Kimmerly Says:

    But my favourite moment is when George Sanders’ date shrugs her shoulders and turns into Marilyn Monroe.
    And the snowmobile.

  2. lazaruslair Says:

    I was going to mention Marilyn Monroe but it was such a small part.

    I liked the scene where Sanders points Marilyn towards a producer and tells her:

    GS: “Thats … ,now go do some good.”
    MR: “Why do they all look like unhappy rabbits?”
    GS: “Because that’s what they are. No go and make him happy.”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: