Movie Reviews 8

Cut (2000)
Despite many problems with this movie, I enjoyed it. A bunch of kids in a movie making class decide that their class project will be completing a horror movie that was never finished years ago because the movie was interrupted when the ‘slasher’ character actor killed the director. Much to the chagrin and protests of the teacher, who also happened to work on the original, the kids get one of the original actresses (Molly Ringwald), a once promising actress who has since turned into a passé Hollywood snob to play a role in the resurrected film. They even manage to get the original mansion in which the movie is set and everything is pretty much exactly is it was 20 years earlier (duh!). The ‘slasher’ in the pic wears mask and keeps silent, so you can already see where this is going. Ya, the kids start dying. Ya, there is someone else donning the mask. Ya, you have to figure out who is really behind all the killing and why. Despite the over-used tropes, there are enough cool elements and a few unexpected twists that kept me interested. Molly Ringwald, a once promising actress puts in a great performance a once promising actress who has turned into a passé hollywood snob. But she’s not a snob. At least I don’t think she is.

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (2003)
How can a high budget special effects laden movie with so many stunning visuals fail so miserably? And a adaptation of an Alan Moore graphic novel no less. I tried watching this a few years ago and didn’t get very far but the conditions were not ideal and I promised myself I’d give it another try. The concept of having all these turn of the century literary characters coming together to face an evil entity sounds great. But the movie just doesn’t click. I’ve got the graphic novel sitting on my shelves and will have to get to it soon to compare.

The Cell (2000)
How can a high budget special effects laden movie with so many stunning visuals fail so miserably? (First Ultraviolet, then League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, now this. I sense a trend.) I confess that I saw this one a few years ago and recall that I liked it more than the critics when it came out. But despite the fancy scenery, I did not enjoy this as much the second time around. I think that it has finally sunk into my head that Jennifer Lopez cannot act, a concept that everyone else embraced long ago. The story deals with people being able to enter other peoples comatose dreams and is wrapped around an urgent case to see where a sadistic murderer (Vincent D’Onofrio) has hidden his last victim. But there are so many plot holes that just make the whole movie so silly and implausible that it got on my nerves.

The Brain That Wouldn’t Die (1962)
The Brain That Wouldn't DieI’ve commented on this classic before. My penchant for decapitation scenarios aside, there is so much nostalgia going for this movie that it would place high on my list of “B-Movies You Gotta See”, perhaps the very top. This 1959 black and white no-budget has it all. A ‘monster’ in a closet, the ‘good’ doctor reprimanding the ‘evil’ doctor on going too far with his research in reanimating the dead, a sax heavy jazzy beat score, and an impromptu beauty contest that is added for no other reason than to titillate (is there ever any other reason?). When the evil doctor crashes his sporty convertible and sees his fiance die before his eyes, he sees the opportunity to further his clandestine research and snatches the girls head from wreckage. Back at the lab, he mounts the head into a dishpan with all the necessary nutrient feed tubes to revive it. Before long, she awakens to the horror of her captive situation. A promise from the doctor to find a beautiful body on which to remount the head is not enough to console the girl. Especially after seeing the not-so-successful preceding experiment results. As the doc searches for a ravishing cute bod (cue the sax music), the head plots her revenge. You have to see it to believe it.

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